Fully-funded PhD Studentships in History/Historical Studies

http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/research/funded-studentships.shtml

To mark the launch of our Graduate School in October 2016, The Open University is making a strategic investment in up to 30 PhD studentships. As part of this initiative, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is keen to receive applications for studentships in history/historical studies or sociology (both broadly defined to include historical and/or sociological approaches to any area of the Arts and Social Sciences). Open University Graduate School PhD studentships will cover full fees and stipend (currently £14,057 p.a.) for 3 years commencing October 2016 (or shortly thereafter). Applications are invited from both UK and EU citizens for full-time study.

The Faculty performed strongly in the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), with 76% of research in History and 64% of research in Sociology assessed as world-leading or internationally excellent (4* or 3*) for its overall quality. Other highlights include Music, which had 94% of research world-leading or internationally excellent, Art and Design with 86%, and Geography and English Language and Literature, which both had 76%.  Art and Design, Development Studies, English, Geography, History and Music all had 100% of their research assessed at 4* or 3* for impact.

The Open University has a world class reputation for research and our research student community is part of this research effort.  In joining us you will join an existing community of over 1,000 PhD students, receive high quality supervision from leading academics, and undergo training that will support you to reach your potential and develop as an open, engaged researcher in our digitally interconnected world.

The deadline for applications is 29th July 2016 and full details on how to apply are set out below.

The Faculty of Arts and Social Science has a strong track record of innovative, interdisciplinary research, and hence is very open to projects which apply historical sources/methods/approaches to other Faculty subject areas.

The Open University is a pioneer in co-supervision across traditional disciplinary boundaries and interdisciplinary proposals are encouraged. Successful applicants who wish to study across traditional disciplinary boundaries will be allocated supervisors from two or more disciplines according to the needs of their planned research.

Applications are particularly sought which apply an historical approach/perspective to the folowing areas:

Art History/History

Specialisms include Byzantine art; the Renaissance (both in Italy and in Northern Europe); a cross-period interest in gender studies; eighteenth and twentieth-century architecture; and Heritage Studies.

More details:

Classical Studies/Digital Humanities/History

We particularly welcome applications from candidates with  interests in a study on how linked ancient world data, which enable the generation and analysis of networks of people through the events, places, dates and prosopographical data that connect them, could impact on the study of ancient history. The project will include observational and literary analysis of digital scholarship in ancient history, as well as a small experimental or demonstration project of the student’s own design.

More details:

Digital Humanities/History

Digital Humanities is the critical study of how digital technologies and methods intersect with Humanities scholarship and scholarly communication. Historically focused areas of Digital Humanities at The Open University include Digital Classics, History of the Book, and Commodity Histories.

English/History

Historically-focussedresearchby academics in English spans the early modern period to the present day. Both the Book History and Postcolonial Literatures Research Groups have long-standing AHRC-funded projects, such as the ‘Reading Experience Database’ and the ‘Beyond the Frame’ project.

More details:

History

While open to applications in any of its areas of research, the History discipline is particularly keen to receive applications on topics related to criminal justice history, imperial and postcolonial history and the early modern period.

Further information about existing research in these areas can be found via the following links:

More details about PhD study in History.

Music/History

The Department has expertise in various aspects of music history and the cultural study of music from the middle ages to the present day. In addition to studies of individual composers, historical research covers areas such as systems of musical patronage and dissemination, music and literature, film music and devotional music.

More details:

Philosophy/History

There is a particular interest in late 19th and 20th century European intellectual and cultural history, history of philosophy, or history of science.

More details:

Religious Studies/History

Specialist expertise in religious history includes evangelical and charismatic movements in the 19th and 20th century North Atlantic world, modern Hinduism, historical approaches to religious conflict, and the history of pilgrimage.

More details:

Application process

Potential applicants not already in contact with a member of Open University academic staff and interested in a studentship in History/Historical Studies should, in the first instance, make informal contact with Professor Paul Lawrence (History Department) using the email address FASS-Research-Degrees@open.ac.uk and the Subject Line ‘History PhD Studentship Application’. Professor Lawrence will liaise with relevant colleagues within the Faculty to enable informal discussions with potential supervisors to take place prior to formal application.

The deadline for applications is 29th July 2016. Applications should be made via the Research Degrees Application form, available via http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/research-degrees/how-to-apply.

In addition to the application form, and as part of the application process, all candidates must prepare and submit a Research Studentship Proposal.

Interviews will take place in week of 22nd August 2016, with short-listed candidates informed during the preceding week.

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New OU/BBC Series: Genius of The Modern World

Genius-of-the-modern-worldOn Thursday 16th June 2016, Genius of the Modern World will be shown on BBC4 at 21:00.

Produced with the support of the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences, in this three part series Bettany Hughes retraces the lives of three great thinkers whose ideas shaped the modern world: Karl Marx, Frederick Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. Born in the 19th century they lived through a time when old certainties were breaking down, regimes were overthrown by mass uprisings and science was undermining religious authority. Their challenge was to figure out what makes us human in a fast-evolving world.
Part 1: Marx – born wealthy, became angry, idealistically radical, constantly on the run for his political agitating and incendiary writing. Marx’s explosive analysis of capitalism, Das Capital, was largely over-looked in his lifetime, and only 11 people attended his funeral. Yet his ideas would generate one of the most influential, and divisive ideologies in history. Drawing on new evidence Bettany reveals the flesh-and-blood man and his ground-breaking ideas.
Part 2 Nietzsche – Bettany travels across Europe in the footsteps of the both brilliant and dangerous German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. His uncompromising and often brutal ideas smashed the comfortable assumptions of religion, morality and science. Yet appropriated by the Nazis, his work is amongst the most devastatingly manipulated and misinterpreted in history. His philosophical quest led him to isolation and ultimately madness, but his ideas helped shape the intellectual landscape of the modern world.
Part 3 Freud – Bettany travels to Vienna on the trail of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis. Freud’s influence surrounds us in our vocabulary; repression, penis envy and the Freudian slip. Also in the freedom we take for granted to talk openly about our deepest feelings and insecurities. A pioneer in the study of the human mind, Freud’s psychoanalytic methods addressed emotional issues seldom even discussed in the 19th century. Talking to his patients inspired his radical understanding of the unconscious mind, as a repository of hidden repressed emotions, and irrational primal desires.
Online:

OpenLearn has extensive content in connection with the programmes. For more information go to http://www.open.edu/openlearn/whats-on/tv/genius-the-modern-world (Please note that content may not be available before the date of broadcast).
This series was commissioned by the Open University, and supported by the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences. Nominated Academics for the series are Dr Gerry Mooney, Dr Manuel Dries, and Prof. Paul Stenner and the Media Fellows are Sue Hemmings and Dr Chris Williams

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The Greeks didn’t have a word for it [homosexuality]

“The word ‘homosexuality’ only goes back to 1869”: Prof Helen King explores how the ancient Greeks didn’t even have a word for it through revisiting Sir Kenneth Dover’s Greek Homosexuality, first published in 1978. 

“A genital act was not in itself morally right or morally wrong, and what mattered was whether it was welcome and agreeable to all the participants.”

Read Prof King’s piece in the original English at https://sharedconversations.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/the-greeks-didnt-have-a-word-for-it/ or in its Portuguese translation at http://www.rnottmagazine.com/#!Os-Gregos-não-tinham-uma-palavra-para-isso/c109z/575c74ce0cf2cc77abffc4f1

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What is Arts Student Hub Live 2016? #studenthublive16

The next Student Hub Live event on the 10 and 11 June is an Arts Hub event. This is for all people who have a passion for the Arts – anyone is welcome, especially those who are studying or researching the Arts. http://studenthublive.kmi.open.ac.uk/

It will be a celebration for those who are completing modules and a chance to look ahead at the next steps, particularly for students at the end of Level 1. Involving students, tutors and lecturers, it’s a packed programme full of things you might not expect.

We have a day and evening line up covering English, Creative Writing, Classical Studies, Religious Studies, Philosophy, Art History, Music, History and more. The Level 2 module teams will be telling us about what’s exciting about their modules, including the new modules being presented for the first time in 2016. If you’ve already taken a module at Level 2, come along and tell us and other students what you enjoyed most about it.

As well as discussions about modules and subjects, we’ll be exploring how to manage digital media to support your studies, and how to identify career and employability skills from your Arts studies, with useful sessions about resilience and managing disappointment, and what to do if you change your mind about your choices.

In the evening we will be having lots of fun with our interactive quizzes, where you can play along against our studio panel, and discussions about the Arts. Watch philosopher pugilists duke it out; Classicists ‘show and tell’; Art Historians dissect artefacts; and how randomly picked objects relate to the Arts. You’ll even discover why Arts students are dangerous!

The full event programme, with more details, is available on the website. You can pop in and out as you wish during the event, and access the event from your computer, tablet, or mobile phone. You can watch the discussions, and engage with other people in the chat box.

Not only can you talk to others in our Open University Community about pretty much anything that’s on your mind, but you can also ask the panel questions, and we bring all of your contributions into the event via our Social Media team.

All the information for the event is available on the website. Please add the event to your calendar and if you give us your email address by clicking the “count me in button”, we can keep you updated. If you can’t attend during the set times, there is also a catch up service!

Sign up and explore the event at http://studenthublive.kmi.open.ac.uk/ . That’s also where you access the event by clicking the “Watch now” button when the event is on.

You can view the taster videos on the Student Hub site, on the Arts Facebook page http://bit.ly/22q8Y8D or via our youtube channel playlist http://bit.ly/1WVZ4fz . All the latest news is on Twitter #studenthublive16

These events really are great fun – hope to see you there on 10 and 11 June.

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Arts Student Hub Live 10-11 June

Arts Student Hub LiveThe next Student Hub Live event on the 10 and 11 June is an Arts Hub event. This is for all people who have a passion for the Arts – anyone is welcome, especially those who are studying or researching the Arts. http://studenthublive.kmi.open.ac.uk/

It will be a celebration of completing modules and a chance to look ahead, particularly for students at the end of Level 1. We will have a day and evening line up covering English, Creative Writing, the Classics, Religious Studies, Philosophy, Art History, Music, History and more. The Level 2 module teams will be telling us about what’s exciting about their modules for those thinking of taking one, or you already have, tell us what you enjoyed most about it. In the evening we will be having lots of fun with our interactive quiz where you can play along against our studio panel, and discussions about the Arts as well as useful advice for students such as our session about resilience.

If you look at the website you can see the programme, and during the event you can pop in and out as you wish. You can access the event from your computer, tablet, or mobile phone, and from there you can watch the discussions, and ideally engage with other people in the chat box.

Not only can you talk to others in our Open University Community about pretty much anything that’s on your mind, but you can also ask the panel questions and we bring all of your contributions into the event via our Social media team.

All the information is available on the website, and that’s also where you access the event by clicking the “Watch now” button when the event is on. Please add the event to your calendar and if you give us your email address by clicking the “count me in button” we can keep you updated. If you can’t attend during the set times, there is a catch up service also!

These events really are great fun – hope to see you there on the 10 and 11 June.

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Reading Communities: Connecting the Past and the Present

‘Reading Communities’ is a follow-on project from the UK Reading Experience Database (RED). RED is an open access database, and the largest resource recording the experiences of readers of its kind anywhere.

Running from December 2015 to November 2016, ‘Reading Communities’ is a 12 month AHRC project, led by Dr Shafquat Towheed, with Dr Edmund King, and Dr Maya Parmar, who are all based in The Open University’s English Department.

The project team is staging a series of themed events around the UK. Event activities include hands-on workshop sessions, round table discussions with members of reading groups, public lectures by acknowledged experts in the history of reading, oral history interviews, and literary readings.

Events will be timed to coincide with reading-related events and anniversaries throughout the year and all events are open to the public and are free to attend.

In April the team visited Belfast, partnering with the OU in Northern Ireland and Verbal Arts. NvTv, a community TV station, visited us during our day of interactive events, producing a film. They broadcast the programme called ‘Focal Point’ on Friday 15 April at 7.00pm, and you can see the programme at http://www.open.ac.uk/research/reading-communities/

Posted in Conferences, seminars, talks, public events, Research | Leave a comment

Reading Communities: Connecting the Past and the Present

‘Reading Communities’ is a follow-on project from the UK Reading Experience Database (RED). RED is an open access database, and the largest resource recording the experiences of readers of its kind anywhere.

Running from December 2015 to November 2016, ‘Reading Communities’ is a 12 month AHRC project, led by Dr Shafquat Towheed, with Dr Edmund King, and Dr Maya Parmar, who are all based in The Open University’s English Department.

The project team is staging a series of themed events around the UK. Event activities include hands-on workshop sessions, round table discussions with members of reading groups, public lectures by acknowledged experts in the history of reading, oral history interviews, and literary readings.

Events will be timed to coincide with reading-related events and anniversaries throughout the year and all events are open to the public and are free to attend.

In April the team visited Belfast, partnering with the OU in Northern Ireland and Verbal Arts. NvTv, a community TV station, visited us during our day of interactive events, producing a film. They broadcast the programme called ‘Focal Point’ on Friday 15 April at 7.00pm, and you can see the programme at http://www.open.ac.uk/research/reading-communities/

Posted in Conferences, seminars, talks, public events, Research | Leave a comment